Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Modern Biology and Biology Today

Modern Biology
Modern biology began during the 17th century when humans finally had the knowledge, skill, and equipment to seek answers to such questions. During that century Robert Hooke (1635-1703) and Anton van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723) introduced a new tool, the microscope, to the scientific world. Another pioneer of modern biology was William Harvey (1578-1657), an English physician. He showed the importance in biological studies of well-designed experiments and careful observations. He traced the pattern of circulation of blood in humans, and showed that it travelled in one direction through the arteries and veins in a circular path.
The search for still more knowledge by curious scientists led them to ask even more complex question: What do the parts of a living thing do? How do the parts work? With the asking of such questions, biology truly came of age.

Biology Today

Modern biology is vast science. Over 1,500,000 different kinds or species of organisms have been identified and new ones are still being discovered. Biologists think that there may be over 2,000,000 different species on earth. They range in size and complexity from tiny bacteria to trees and humans. Because biology is such a large field, it is broken down into several subdivisions for easier study. These observations are formed according to the group of organisms being studied or the approach taken to the study of the organisms.



Modern biology is vast science. Over 1,500,000 different kinds or species of organisms have been identified and new ones are still being discovered. Biologists think that there may be over 2,000,000 different species on earth. They range in size and complexity from tiny bacteria to trees and humans.
The current rate of extinctions is about 1,000 times faster than normal, and human activities are responsible for the acceleration. At this rate, we will never know about most of the species that are alive on Earth today. Does that matter? 
Biologists think so. Whether or not we are aware of it, we humans are intimately connected with the world around us. We are profoundly changing the entire fabric of life on Earth. The changes are, in turn, affecting us in ways we are just beginning to fathom. Ironically, the more we learn about nature, the more we realize we have yet to learn.